Grandparents and grandkids working together.
Ashley, Robyn, Nola and Dillion work together during school holidays on a CasKids Auxiliary stall at the RCH to raise money for sick kids.
Read more: http://rchfoundation.org.au/?page=Detail&item=The-Next-Generation-of-Auxiliaries

Grandparents and grandkids working together.

Ashley, Robyn, Nola and Dillion work together during school holidays on a CasKids Auxiliary stall at the RCH to raise money for sick kids.

Read more: http://rchfoundation.org.au/?page=Detail&item=The-Next-Generation-of-Auxiliaries

Allina Doyle became a passionate supporter of cystic fibrosis research at the Royal Children’s Hospital (RCH), after close friends discovered their son was born with cystic fibrosis. Now they’re rallying together as a community to help find a cure. Read more: http://rchfoundation.org.au/?page=Detail&item=Supporting-friends-and-family-the-greatest-inspiration-of-all

Allina Doyle became a passionate supporter of cystic fibrosis research at the Royal Children’s Hospital (RCH), after close friends discovered their son was born with cystic fibrosis. Now they’re rallying together as a community to help find a cure. Read more: http://rchfoundation.org.au/?page=Detail&item=Supporting-friends-and-family-the-greatest-inspiration-of-all

Inspired to help other kids like her treated at hospital, Kalinda raised money for the Royal Children’s Hospital by selling homemade bookmarks and perfume made from flowers collected from the family garden. Cute!
Read more: http://rchfoundation.org.au/?page=Detail&item=Kids-helping-other-kids-Every-bit-counts

Inspired to help other kids like her treated at hospital, Kalinda raised money for the Royal Children’s Hospital by selling homemade bookmarks and perfume made from flowers collected from the family garden. Cute!

Read more: http://rchfoundation.org.au/?page=Detail&item=Kids-helping-other-kids-Every-bit-counts

I could never imagine how I might handle one of my little girls being chronically ill,” explained Mark Minehan, owner and Managing Director of the Royal Standard Hotel in West Melbourne.
But that’s exactly what Mark’s close mate Mal experienced, when he lost his nine year old son Johnno to an ongoing battle with liver disease.
Running fundraising events - raffles, auctions, food, drink and live music - in both Sydney and Melbourne, Mal and Mark work closely together to make a difference. They’ve also had heaps of help along the way.
Over the past three years, Mark and his team have raised nearly $13,000.
Their extraordinary efforts have gone towards play therapy in the hospital, as well as entertainment resources for families awaiting treatment in emergency.
Read more: http://rchfoundation.org.au/?page=Detail&item=Mates-support-each-other-to-help-sick-kids

I could never imagine how I might handle one of my little girls being chronically ill,” explained Mark Minehan, owner and Managing Director of the Royal Standard Hotel in West Melbourne.

But that’s exactly what Mark’s close mate Mal experienced, when he lost his nine year old son Johnno to an ongoing battle with liver disease.

Running fundraising events - raffles, auctions, food, drink and live music - in both Sydney and Melbourne, Mal and Mark work closely together to make a difference. They’ve also had heaps of help along the way.

Over the past three years, Mark and his team have raised nearly $13,000.

Their extraordinary efforts have gone towards play therapy in the hospital, as well as entertainment resources for families awaiting treatment in emergency.

Read more: http://rchfoundation.org.au/?page=Detail&item=Mates-support-each-other-to-help-sick-kids

Melbourne’s famous Block Arcade, together with the American Women’s Auxiliary invite you to attend a high cocktail function in support of The Children’s Bioethics Centre at The Royal Children’s Hospital (RCH). 
Perfect for style-loving Melbournites – there will be champagne, hors d’oeuvres by Hopetoun Tea Rooms, and fashion. 
Everyone is welcome to join us at this beautiful occasion on Wednesday 19 June.  
This fundraising event will celebrate the ‘Memories of Melbourne’ andfeature an exclusive fashion parade of Melbourne’s signature style from the 1880s until now. 
There will be a silent auction and raffle with wonderful prizes - all for an excellent cause, the RCH’s world-leading Children’s Bioethics Centre. 
Wednesday 19 June from 7pm. Tickets are $120 per person 
BOOK NOW - click here for more info.

Melbourne’s famous Block Arcade, together with the American Women’s Auxiliary invite you to attend a high cocktail function in support of The Children’s Bioethics Centre at The Royal Children’s Hospital (RCH).

Perfect for style-loving Melbournites – there will be champagne, hors d’oeuvres by Hopetoun Tea Rooms, and fashion.

Everyone is welcome to join us at this beautiful occasion on Wednesday 19 June. 

This fundraising event will celebrate the ‘Memories of Melbourne’ andfeature an exclusive fashion parade of Melbourne’s signature style from the 1880s until now.

There will be a silent auction and raffle with wonderful prizes - all for an excellent cause, the RCH’s world-leading Children’s Bioethics Centre.

Wednesday 19 June from 7pm. Tickets are $120 per person

BOOK NOW - click here for more info.

We are so excited that the Herald Sun has featured one of our most inspiring up and coming young fundraisers, Jessica and her band of sisters, who saw children in need and decided to help. 
Having originally appeared in the Herald Sun, and written by Christian Tatman, it tells the story of 12 year old Jessica, who having had heart surgery twice (before the age of three) in the UK before her family migrated to Australia, Jessica knew the importance of specialised hospital services for children.
Since then, Jessica has been to The Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne many times for treatment and wanted to do something to help.
So Jessica’s Big Heart fundraiser was born after a heartfelt effort that included her sister Abi and a group of friends from Balcombe Grammar School.
To read more about this story visit our website.
This story and image originally appeared in the Herald Sun. 
IMAGE: JESSICA AND FELLOW STUDENTS (BACK FROM LEFT) RUBY, CHLOE, FLYNN, STEPH AND BELLA ALONG WITH (FRONT FROM LEFT) ALYSSA, ABI AND TAYLAH HAVE PUT IN HOURS FOR THEIR FUNDRAISER FOR ROYAL CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL. PICTURE: SUSAN WINDMILLER LEADER

We are so excited that the Herald Sun has featured one of our most inspiring up and coming young fundraisers, Jessica and her band of sisters, who saw children in need and decided to help. 

Having originally appeared in the Herald Sun, and written by Christian Tatman, it tells the story of 12 year old Jessica, who having had heart surgery twice (before the age of three) in the UK before her family migrated to Australia, Jessica knew the importance of specialised hospital services for children.

Since then, Jessica has been to The Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne many times for treatment and wanted to do something to help.

So Jessica’s Big Heart fundraiser was born after a heartfelt effort that included her sister Abi and a group of friends from Balcombe Grammar School.

To read more about this story visit our website.

This story and image originally appeared in the Herald Sun

IMAGE: JESSICA AND FELLOW STUDENTS (BACK FROM LEFT) RUBY, CHLOE, FLYNN, STEPH AND BELLA ALONG WITH (FRONT FROM LEFT) ALYSSA, ABI AND TAYLAH HAVE PUT IN HOURS FOR THEIR FUNDRAISER FOR ROYAL CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL. PICTURE: SUSAN WINDMILLER LEADER

The trip of a lifetime. You can take part.

Spend five magical days hiking the Great Wall of China, taking in panoramic mountain views and experiencing one of the wonders of the world.

Enjoy sightseeing, shopping and eating in Beijing, one of the world’s most exciting cities.

See Tiananmen Square and the Forbidden City, learn Tai Chi, bike through ancient hutongs, taste Peking duck – and share it all with a bunch of new friends.

Help The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation influence the future of children’s health, making a real, positive difference to the lives of thousands of children and their families through our hospital.

You can take part in this trip of a lifetime.

It’s happening in October 2013. 

Find out all about it here.

Olympic champion Alisa Camplin honours son with gift to the RCH

On 23 April, Alisa and Oliver Camplin-Warner presented a gift to the doctors that supported their son Finnan.

image

The 2013 Finnan’s Gift Grant of $20,000 was presented to the RCH Perfusion team, who operate sophisticated life-support machines that take on the work of the heart and lungs whilst surgeons operate on our most fragile children.

image

"Finnan spent most of his short life under the care of the Perfusion Department. Everyone needs to know how important these amazing scientists are to cardiac patients and their families.

“The RCH Perfusion Department are leading edge, so we know that Finnan received the greatest possible medical care in the world.  We just want to help them get better and better,” Alisa said.

Read more.

Solving the paediatric plastic surgery puzzle

A new appointment at The Royal Children’s Hospital (RCH), will further cement our hospital as a world leader in children’s facial surgery.

image

Professor Tony Penington was announced as the ‘The Jigsaw Foundation Chair of Paediatric Plastic and Maxillofacial Surgery’ on 17 April.

AAP reports: With her nails painted and dressed in her school uniform Trishna is just like any other six-year-old.

Six years ago things were very different: Trishna needed a miracle and it was surgeons at the RCH, including the maxillofacial team, who made it happen.

The Melbourne Research Unit for Facial Disorders and the RCH department of Plastic and Maxillofacial Surgery is already a clinical leader both in Australia and internationally.

The department received international acclaim for its contribution to the successful separation of formerly conjoined twins Trishna and Krishna in 2009.

Prof Penington said his research will initially focus on life-long birth-marks that cause deformity of the face, pain and other problems.

The esteemed Professorial Chair position is made possible thanks to the advocacy and contribution of the Jigsaw Foundation, and generous funding from the RCH Foundation, and the Federal and State governments, totalling $15 million.

The Jigsaw and The Royal Children’s Hospital foundations, and the State and Federal governments are investing in the idea that medical research has the capacity to transform the lives of children who suffer from deformity and disease,” Professor Penington said.

“The children who come under our care deserve not only the best care we can give them today, but the hope for a better future that only medical research can provide.”

Read more or donate now to this incredible department of the RCH.

Photo: Prof Tony Penington, Trishna and Atom Rahman at the RCH.

Entertainment Books now available!

The new 2013/2014 Entertainment Books are better than ever with valuable offers from popular restaurants, attractions, accommodation and more!  

Purchase your entertainment book for only $65 from Trailblazers Auxiliary and you’ll not only receive $15,000 worth of valuable offers valid until 1 June 2014, but you’ll also support the RCH Foundation. 

The Entertainment Books are available now from the RCH Gift Shop (opposite the Pharmacy in Main St of the RCH now :) or they can be ordered online. Make sure you don’t miss out!

Playing music from a young age – on a recorder, piano or simply pots and pans – is something we all take for granted. 
Most children make and hear music at home, in kindergarten, through school, and develop happy memories associated with their favourite tunes. It’s a familiar part of life for many children and crucial for their development.
“Hospital can be an unfamiliar and stressful environment and Music Therapy can provide children with familiar musical experiences that reduce stress and promote positive coping,” explained The Royal Children’s Hospital (RCH) Music Therapy Team Leader, Beth Dun.
Having worked as a music therapist at the RCH for more than 20 years, Beth explained how the team of professionally trained music therapists support babies, children and adolescents using therapy sessions to assist with all aspects of their hospital experiences. 
“Music can engage even the sickest child … if you can hear sounds or feel vibration you can benefit from music therapy.”
Beth recalled a story of a little girl in Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU), who had experienced severe burns. She was heavily bandaged and due to her injuries at the time she was unable to speak. The Music Therapist created a special personalised music program that encouraged this little girl to engage in sessions by eye pointing to indicate her song choices. This helped to calm and reassure her in what could have been a stressful and scary time.  
Music therapy also allows children to engage in a fun and easy way that distracts from the stress of medical treatment. With so much time spent in hospital, it is important that our sickest children get a chance to communicate their own choices, and have opportunities to engage and participate wherever possible. 
While the RCH Music Therapists work everyday miracles on the wards and in waiting rooms, it’s the support of the Music Therapy Auxiliary that has helped the program to flourish.
Beth said: “I’m very grateful to the Music Therapy Auxiliary for their hard work and support over the years. The money they have raised has enabled the Music Therapy team to provide direct programs to a huge number of children and families across the 20 years the Auxiliary has been supporting us.”  
Having raised more than $250,000 over 20 years, the Music Therapy Auxiliary was originally set up by Valma Edwards and Barbara Dun, who were inspired by Beth’s work with sick children. With more members of the community coming on board, the Auxiliary extended and helped cement this important program at the RCH. 
While the Music Therapy Auxiliary has recently decided to wind down operations, their legacy will continue through a vibrant music therapy program that is embedded into the hospital’s commitment to create a real difference for sick kids. 
“With the help of supporters like the Music Therapy Auxiliary, we can make a real positive difference in sick children’s lives, and enhance the high level of patient and family centred care that the RCH is renowned for,” said Beth. 
To support world-class care like Music Therapy at the RCH, donate here. 

Playing music from a young age – on a recorder, piano or simply pots and pans  is something we all take for granted. 

Most children make and hear music at home, in kindergarten, through school, and develop happy memories associated with their favourite tunes. It’s a familiar part of life for many children and crucial for their development.

“Hospital can be an unfamiliar and stressful environment and Music Therapy can provide children with familiar musical experiences that reduce stress and promote positive coping,” explained The Royal Children’s Hospital (RCH) Music Therapy Team Leader, Beth Dun.

Having worked as a music therapist at the RCH for more than 20 years, Beth explained how the team of professionally trained music therapists support babies, children and adolescents using therapy sessions to assist with all aspects of their hospital experiences. 

“Music can engage even the sickest child … if you can hear sounds or feel vibration you can benefit from music therapy.”

Beth recalled a story of a little girl in Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU), who had experienced severe burns. She was heavily bandaged and due to her injuries at the time she was unable to speak. The Music Therapist created a special personalised music program that encouraged this little girl to engage in sessions by eye pointing to indicate her song choices. This helped to calm and reassure her in what could have been a stressful and scary time.  

Music therapy also allows children to engage in a fun and easy way that distracts from the stress of medical treatment. With so much time spent in hospital, it is important that our sickest children get a chance to communicate their own choices, and have opportunities to engage and participate wherever possible. 

While the RCH Music Therapists work everyday miracles on the wards and in waiting rooms, it’s the support of the Music Therapy Auxiliary that has helped the program to flourish.

Beth said: “I’m very grateful to the Music Therapy Auxiliary for their hard work and support over the years. The money they have raised has enabled the Music Therapy team to provide direct programs to a huge number of children and families across the 20 years the Auxiliary has been supporting us.”  

Having raised more than $250,000 over 20 years, the Music Therapy Auxiliary was originally set up by Valma Edwards and Barbara Dun, who were inspired by Beth’s work with sick children. With more members of the community coming on board, the Auxiliary extended and helped cement this important program at the RCH. 

While the Music Therapy Auxiliary has recently decided to wind down operations, their legacy will continue through a vibrant music therapy program that is embedded into the hospital’s commitment to create a real difference for sick kids. 

“With the help of supporters like the Music Therapy Auxiliary, we can make a real positive difference in sick children’s lives, and enhance the high level of patient and family centred care that the RCH is renowned for,” said Beth. 

To support world-class care like Music Therapy at the RCH, donate here

The legacy of the epic  Rats of Tobruck continued as the group of World War II veterans attended a morning tea at the RCH to unveil a tribute to the Rats themselves on 5 December 2012. 
The former soldiers fought in one of Australia’s most successful military engagements, holding the Libyan port of Tobruk against the Afrika Corps in World War II.
In 2010, The Rats of Tobruk presented a cheque for $1.5 million to The Royal Children’s Hospital (RCH), generously donated from the sale of their Albert Park meeting hall in 2007. Businessman, Bill Gibbons, bought the meeting hall in 2007 when the Rats could no longer afford its upkeep, but the former soldiers were never asked to move out and they continue to meet there every month.
This incredible contribution supports the RCH Neuroscience department by funding an annual fellowship, enabling a clinician to undertake travel to further his/her studies in benefit of the hospital.
The RCH Neuroscience unit has been named the Rats of Tobruk Ward in honour of the Rats’ contribution.  

The legacy of the epic  Rats of Tobruck continued as the group of World War II veterans attended a morning tea at the RCH to unveil a tribute to the Rats themselves on 5 December 2012. 

The former soldiers fought in one of Australia’s most successful military engagements, holding the Libyan port of Tobruk against the Afrika Corps in World War II.

In 2010, The Rats of Tobruk presented a cheque for $1.5 million to The Royal Children’s Hospital (RCH), generously donated from the sale of their Albert Park meeting hall in 2007. Businessman, Bill Gibbons, bought the meeting hall in 2007 when the Rats could no longer afford its upkeep, but the former soldiers were never asked to move out and they continue to meet there every month.

This incredible contribution supports the RCH Neuroscience department by funding an annual fellowship, enabling a clinician to undertake travel to further his/her studies in benefit of the hospital.

The RCH Neuroscience unit has been named the Rats of Tobruk Ward in honour of the Rats’ contribution.  

Concetta’s generosity lives on

Generosity is something that 103-year-old Concetta Isgro will be warmly remembered for by family and friends alike. 

A long-time supporter of The Royal Children’s Hospital (RCH), Concetta had not only raised her own family, but had donated to the RCH throughout her life in order to care for children from other families as well. 

“My Mum believed that the little children needed to grow up healthy,” Grace, her daughter, said. “Every year she supported the Good Friday Appeal and believed that every little bit counts. Even when I was growing up, many years ago, she would always find spare money to donate to the hospital. She never forgot the families in hospital.” 

With a century of a life well-lived behind her, Concetta had experienced changing times and many challenges, including her grandson Robert, and two great-grandson’s – Christopher who was affected by a heart condition, and Adam who suffered a brain tumour. 

All three boys were treated at the Royal Children’s Hospital and it was because of this personal experience that Concetta always encouraged the whole family to support the RCH. Concetta was also greatly inspired by Dame Elisabeth Murdoch, and felt that she too could make a difference. 

And make a difference she did.  When celebrating her 100th birthday Concetta and her family raised an incredible $12,000 in celebration of this milestone. Upon her passing, Concetta’s family once again honoured her memory by asking their friends and family to donate gifts in memory.

 “We want to encourage everybody to help the children’s hospital,” Grace said on behalf of Concetta’s family and friends.” It’s important; the little ones have to grow up healthy. We are all proud of my Mum’s donations, and because of her we continue to donate and encourage others to donate too.”

Anyone can make a gift in memory for a loved one as a meaningful tribute like Grace’s family and friends have done for Concetta. Your thoughtful donation to the RCH Foundation will help make a world of difference to sick children treated in hospital.  

To find out more about gifts in memory, click here

Recently, some incredible girls from South Auburn Primary School donated iPods for the Emergency Department of the RCH. Mei, Claire, Jasmin, Fiona and Annabelle thought that other kids that have to visit Emergency might feel comforted by listening to music, and sold lollies and lucky dips at school to raise money. Here they are presenting their iPods to the RCH’s Manager of Play and Music Therapy, Louise Marbina. Well done girls!

Recently, some incredible girls from South Auburn Primary School donated iPods for the Emergency Department of the RCH. Mei, Claire, Jasmin, Fiona and Annabelle thought that other kids that have to visit Emergency might feel comforted by listening to music, and sold lollies and lucky dips at school to raise money. Here they are presenting their iPods to the RCH’s Manager of Play and Music Therapy, Louise Marbina. Well done girls!

Miracle baby Connor thrives

imageAt 16 months old, Vermont toddler Connor Anastasopoulos is lucky to be alive after a battle with meningitis. Born five weeks premature in October 2011, he contracted the virus when he was only a few daus old. It quickly attacked his major organs and at only nine days old, he suffered a heart attack. 

His parents, Steven and Kathy, alongside the RCH staff, decided to place Connor on life support. After a gruelling 24 days, little Connor pulled through and spend the next four months in the RCH’s care. 

“The children’s hospital is an amazing place,” Kathy said.  “I never gave up on my child and they never gave up either.”

Whilst Connor remains on medication and has a blood clot in his neck, he is otherwise a happy and healthy toddler. “You wouldn’t believe it’s the same child,” Kathy said.

The family are grateful that Connor’s recovery is thanks to the doctors and nurses at The Royal Children’s Hospital and they want to help more sick children by fundraising. 

Already they have raised $10,000 and their next fundraiser  will be a barbeque held on March 23 sat Brentford Square Shopping Centre, Forest Hill to raise funds for The Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation.

To read more of Connor’s story or donate visit www.miraclebabyconnor.com or read the full article in the Whitehorse Leader.

note: loading more posts will reset any filters applied
More